The SuperSub was one of the most innovative laws in recent Cricket’s history but unfortunately was short lived.

Also Read: 15 Cricket Problems That Needs to Be Solved in the Next Decade | How to Fix Cricket 101

What was the Super Sub Rule?

At the beginning of a One Day International (ODI) match, the teams would list 12 players, where the twelfth man actually could make a tangible impact in the game — The Super Sub.

They could either replace a bowler and finish their quota, be picked as a wicketkeeper (which usual substitutes could not without special permission) or could replace a batter for the remainder of the game.

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Who Was the First SuperSub in Cricket?

Vikram Solanki, pictured above, was the first SuperSub. On July 7th, 2005 he became the first SuperSub after replacing Simon Jones (but didn’t get to bat since England finished the chase early).

Source: 7th July, 2005: England’s Vikram Solanki Becomes Cricket’s First-ever Super-sub

When was the SuperSub Rule Implemented?

The SuperSub Rule briefly lasted between 2005 and 2006, but due to its controversial nature, was removed by 2006.

Why did the SuperSub Innovation Fail?

The Super Sub rule failed due to the rigidity in the system.

The substitute player had to be picked before the toss. Hence, variations in the game could nullify the substitute selection. What if a team went with four pace bowlers and the ball started to stop a bit? What if a team needed an extra batter after an early collapse? The Super Sub could not flow with the game and hence, it failed to bring the results it once promised.

In addition, teams brought specialist fielders to replace bowlers to keep energy in the field, which was frowned upon by the opposition.

The X Factor Rule in Big Bash

The Big Bash is now trying out some innovations like the X-Factor.

The X-Factor has the chance of substituting a player after the 10th over in a T20 game, thereby giving both teams a fair level playing field and flexibility.

Read about the X-Factor and other innovations in the Big Bash described by former Australian coach Darren Lehmann.

If ODI Cricket is to Survive, SuperSub and Other Innovations Need to Comeback

At a time when ODI cricket is struggling to find relevance, South Africa are willingly forfeiting an ODI series and jeopardizing their World Cup direct qualification chances to accommodate home grown T20 Leagues, innovations like the SuperSub should be added again.

If the ICC doesn’t act now, the ODI game is good as over.

What do you think? What other innovations could make the ODI game relevant again?

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Check out the Quora response here.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

What was the Super Sub Rule?

At the beginning of a One Day International (ODI) match, the teams would list 12 players, where the twelfth man actually could make a tangible impact in the game — The Super Sub.
They could either replace a bowler and finish their quota, be picked as a wicketkeeper (which usual substitutes could not without special permission),or could replace a batter for the remainder of the game.

Who Was the First SuperSub in Cricket?

Vikram Solanki, pictured above, was the first SuperSub. On July 7th, 2005 he became the first SuperSub after replacing Simon Jones.

Why did the SuperSub Innovation Fail?

The Super Sub rule failed due to the rigidity in the system since the substitute player had to be picked before the toss.

How long did the SuperSub rule last?

The SuperSub rule lasted about one year, between 2005 and 2006.

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